Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Just for fun...check this out!

Which founder are you?

Take a quiz to determine which Founding Father you are most like. It is only 12 questions and takes just a few minutes. If you post the result, I will add one point to any assignment/test/current event that needs a little boost at the end of the quarter.

http://constitutioncenter.org/FoundersQuiz/

Have fun!

31 comments:

  1. Jessica Gao
    6th Period

    I am George Washington! :)

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  2. Gavin Welch
    period 7

    Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790)
    The tenth son of a soap and candlemaker, Franklin, like Alexander Hamilton, stands as an example of the rags-to-riches story. Apprenticed first to his father and later to his half-brother, the printer James Franklin, he demonstrated his literary talents early by publishing anonymous essays in James's newspaper while he was still a teenaged boy. In 1723 Franklin moved to Philadelphia, where, after a two-year hiatus in London, he began a successful career as a printer. His Poor Richard's Almanack gained him fame at home and abroad. A man of Renaissance interests, Franklin was an educational reformer, a philanthropist, and a scientist. His political career was long and distinguished, beginning in the 1750s when he served as a member of the colonial legislature and deputy postmaster of the colonies. He lived in England for much of the period from 1757 to the outbreak of the Revolutionary War, acting as the colonial agent of his own Pennsylvania and several other colonies. He became well-known during the decade of increasing tensions leading to the Revolution, defending the American position on taxation before the House of Commons. Franklin served in the Continental Congress and was one of the members of the committee that drafted the Declaration of Independence. He was chosen to preside over the Pennsylvania constitutional convention as well. During the war Franklin's diplomatic career in France and at the Paris peace treaty negotiations made him the toast of Paris. Dr. Franklin, as he was known, returned to Pennsylvania in 1785 to serve as president of the Supreme Executive Council of his state. By the time of the Philadelphia convention, Franklin was plagued by ill health, but he attended faithfully, expressed his views on a number of key issues, provided expert advice to the nationalist leadership, and was a firm defender of the proposed Constitution. Despite his age and failing health, in 1787 Franklin accepted the position as first president of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery. He died three years later, still active in civic affairs.

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  3. Jenny Jin
    7th period

    George Mason :D

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  4. Elbridge Gerry

    Cole Shoup
    Period 7

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  5. George Mason

    Andrew Cohen
    7th period

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  6. Leila Doerfer
    6th period

    George Mason

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  7. Benjamin Franklin!

    Laura Musalem
    6th period

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  8. Jessica Batson
    7th period

    I got John Rutledge. I had never heard of him before this...

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  9. I got George Mason!
    ~Kate Boyd

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  10. I am Charles Pinckney
    Stacey Cutrell

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  11. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  12. I'm Benjamin Franklin! Exciting!

    Jacob Harris 7th

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  13. George Mason!

    Zach Visco
    Period 6

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  14. Benjamin Franklin!

    (Gavins post made me laugh for a really long time haha.)

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  15. i tried to do this but it said i had to update my flash player

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  16. http://www.constitutioncenter.org/ncc_edu_Virginia.aspx#Mason

    I got Mason

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  17. Norman Archer
    Death, DNA and the Supreme Court
    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/18/opinion/18mon3.html?ref=todayspaper

    This article discusses how DNA testing impacts court cases and the possibility of repeal by the Supreme Court. It states that, as of right now, DNA testing completed after the trial cannot be used by a prisoner to prove their innocence. Often times, biological identification isn’t done during cases at all, and the trial goes on without it. The example given in the article concerned a man in Texas sentenced to death. Only an hour before his execution the supreme granted a postponement so that everything could be worked out. It turns out that biological testing had been done after the case that could change the proof and arguments of the case. As of now, the case remains in question.
    I think that no all evidence concerning the case should be available to be used. DNA testing is a very reliable method for identification and should always be considered. As for going back on a trial, that is a tricky process. It really depends on the specific evidence that the DNA testing provides. It is not just a rule that can be decisive and just for all. It depends on each individual court case.

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  18. Benjamin Franklin

    Norman Archer

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